About LJ Rich

 

As a kid LJ Rich loved both music and technology. She’s fascinated by the nexus of liberal arts, technology and social tech trends and enjoys finding unexpected connections between those areas.  She listens to pretty much every musical genre, and can talk for ages about the parallels between classical and contemporary music, was one of the first to recognise the power of twitter, and will happily chat about  good science fiction or space.

PRESENTING

LJ regularly writes and presents for BBC national television and radio, explaining trends and concepts in technology, social media and consumer electronics.  She’s probably best known as a presenter on BBC’s ‘Click’ technology show, where she’s interviewed everyone from the founder of Twitter to the CEO of Google and travelled the world to chronicle technology trends. She has fixed her own iPad, ridden one of the first VR roller coasters and was recently interviewed by The Scientist about her experiences of synesthesia and perfect pitch.

For speaking and hosting enquiries please use the contact form.

If you’d like to buy Music: iTunes  CDBaby  Amazon Music  Spotify

 

MUSIC / SYNAESTHESIA

From the age of three, LJ sat at the piano, playing along with the radio. Aged eleven, she was awarded a scholarship to the Royal College of Music. She now holds a masters degree in Music from Christ Church College, Oxford. Since then she’s sound engineered for Pete Waterman, toured the USA in a Rock Opera band, and lectured at Harvard.

Synaesthesia  has always inspired LJ’s composing but perhaps also compels her to invent and build interactive music experiences and performances. These range from Live installations at festivals and events (recently LA’s Nocturnal Wonderland, SXSW Interactive and the UK’s Bestival) to intimate performances and live-streaming.

She’s also attempted to create the ultimate dance anthem at London’s Science Museum, co-written a science musical, and built sensory-altering devices.

Check out her TedXTokyo talk on ‘Glitching‘ and ‘A Musician’s Guide to Invention

 

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